[Legends] Death Troopers

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Jaweco
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[Legends] Death Troopers

Message par Jaweco »

Topic consacré au roman Death Troopers, écrit par Joe Schreiber !

Il se déroule en l'an -1. Il s'agit du premier roman d'horreur de la licence SW (si on oublie quelques romans junior), et il met en scène des personnages principalement nouveaux, Han Solo et Chewbacca venant confirmer la règle.

Image

Synopsis :
When the Imperial prison barge Purge — temporary home to five hundred of the galaxy's most ruthless killers, rebels, scoundrels and thieves — breaks down in a distant, uninhabited part of space, its only hope seems to lie with a Star Destroyer found drifting, derelict and seemingly abandoned. But when a boarding party is sent to scavenge for parts, only half of them come back — bringing with them a horrific disease so lethal that within hours, nearly all aboard the Purge will die in ways too hideous to imagine.

And death is only the beginning.

The Purge's half-dozen survivors — two teenage brothers, a sadistic captain of the guards, a couple of rogue smugglers and the chief medical officer, the lone woman on board — will do whatever it takes to stay alive. But nothing can prepare them for what lies waiting onboard the Star Destroyer amid its vast creaking emptiness that isn't really empty at all. The dead are rising, soulless, unstoppable, and unspeakably hungry.
Disponible au format hardcover en VO, le paperback est prévu pour le 26/10/2010. Pas de date pour le moment en ce qui concerne la VF.


Interview de l'auteur :
How did the opportunity arise for you to add zombies to a galaxy far, far away?

My editor at Del Rey is involved in a lot of the Star Wars expanded universe stuff and apparently it came out of a conversation that he and somebody had at a convention about how great it would be to have a Star Wars zombie novel. Eventually, my agent found out about it and I asked to take a swing at it. It was just too good not to try out for.

Are you a hardcore Star Wars fan?

I distinctly remember being seven years old and going with my parents to go see Star Wars, and being completely freaked out and riveted by the experience. It's probably one of the first non-Disney movies I saw on the big screen as a kid. It made a huge impression, obviously. I think we showed up a little bit late, and the first scene I actually saw was Vader coming down the hallway during the blaster battle with the stormtroopers. I was desperate to find out what was going on right from the very first moment.

As a fan of both Star Wars and horror, what to you is the most horrifying part of the saga?

The trash compactor scene! Anything that's underwater and you can't quite see is horrifying. The movie did a great job with that. "Ah! Something just moved past my leg!" is a total horror trope. And it's used to great effect in that scene. Already there's tension; they're in a claustrophobic situation. Every kid knows what it's like to wade in the water and not see where your feet are, then something goes past your leg.

Just the presence of Darth Vader in general is horrifying. He's this guy who's essentially in a walking coffin and there's something really obviously wrong with him because his breathing just sounds unsettling.

What makes some horror fiction and films scarier than others?

In horror films there's a huge temptation to go for, not just the gross-out, but the startle-moment. You can make people jump in their seat with a loud blast of music on the soundtrack, or when a character jumps out at you. But those aren't the horror films that linger with the individual, or in pop culture. The stories that are popular are the ones that create an atmosphere that's familiar and uncanny at the same time; and that deal with characters you can readily identify with from your own experience.

What is it about outer space that makes it the perfect backdrop for horror?

It's a weird combination of how limitless it is and at the same time how claustrophobic and confining it can be. Certainly with the Star Destroyer, I really wanted to explore what it was like to be aboard something that was so big and empty, but at the same time you could feel the pressure of space itself working against the integrity of the ship.

What would it be like to be on-board something that was farther away than the furthest outpost? You feel like you're alone but at the same time know that you aren't. Space, especially Lucas' vision of space, is totally conducive to a horror environment.

With most zombie stories it seems that the real fear sets in when you're looking around a town, or in the case of Death Troopers -- a ship -- and no one is there, but you still feel like someone is watching you.

Steven King talks about that in Salem's Lot. The scariest parts of Salem's Lot isn't when the vampires are jumping out and biting people, it's when you go through the town and no one's there.

What is it about zombies that makes them so popular with horror fans?

They lend themselves to a lot of different situations. They represent the familiar turned into this completely uncanny and impossible to understand version of itself. They're coming for you and they want to eat you. They're not interested in a conversation. They're not Bram Stoker's Dracula. There's nothing romantic about them at all. They're an inarguable force. Clive Barker once described zombies as "the ultimate Liberal nightmare" -- these are the people, the great unwashed, yet all they're interested in doing is devouring you.

The most terrifying thing about zombies is that with bio-warfare being on the cusp of happening in reality, it's not too hard to imagine humans being infected with a synthetic virus that controls them long after they're dead, thus making them the perfect weapon.

Obviously, every scary thing can be pushed to the point that it becomes absurd. But if you're able to manage it in a way and execute it carefully, that idea can be very, very scary.

As you started with the idea of Death Troopers, did you initially want to put in two of the most beloved characters in the original trilogy?

I asked upfront and they said yes. The first outline of the book I wrote was very focused on Han and Chewie. Everyone was like, "No, this isn't scary, it's more action-y; and the biggest problem is if you're going to use these established characters, you know that they're going to survive." And they were right.

As soon as they said that I realized I needed to create new characters that were so sympathetic that they could compete with these beloved characters, and who could potentially be dead by the end.

Once I did that, I could hold off on bringing these established characters into the book, so by the time I do bring them in, it's like this little bomb goes off in the book. That was the challenge.

Did you add them into the story so your readers wouldn't be suffering from adrenaline overload, and could have a sigh of relief knowing that at least two characters they are invested in would live?

That's totally true. I'm not sure if I consciously thought about that but you can use humor or charm to heighten the tension in the story by relieving it a little bit. With a book like Death Troopers, it's a very compulsive, one or two sittings kind of read. That kind of moment can help the pacing of a story.

How did you approach writing Chewbacca's internal dialog for the book?

That was just a rich opportunity that you really can't do in any other format. If you're going to write a Star Wars novel, why not crawl inside the heads of all these characters from film and video games that don't normally allow you to articulate? Once you make that decision, you get to put on the fur and be this creature.

What kind of thought processes do you have when you're someone who can't communicate with 99 percent of who's around? You become very perceptive because you come to rely on all your other senses. You spend a lot of time inside your own head, rather than articulating your thoughts to other people. There's this wisdom to it that I imagine Chewbacca sort of walks around with.

He has a back-story that forms who he is. So why not bring that into play too as he's trying to cope with all the things going on around him? Why not use that as a frame of reference for how he tries to understand all this crazy horror unfolding around him?

Which species makes for a creepier zombie -- human or Wookiee?

We're talking about two different things. As far as the traditional sense, the people make creepier zombies. However, some of the conceptual art coming out for the Wookiee zombies in Star Wars Galaxies if just horrifying. You have this thing that's normally very friendly and engaging, except half of it's missing and you can see its ribs through its torso.

You also have a very strong-willed, independent woman as a main character in the book. Considering that Star Wars is known for its sassy and smart female characters like Princess Leia, Senator Amidala and Ahsoka Tano, was this something you kept in mind as you created the character of Dr. Cody?

I gravitate toward strong female characters. I wrote another book called Chasing the Dead and the main character in that was a single mom put in a situation that she really wasn't ready for in a lot of ways. The woman was a former ambulance driver at one point and then inherited a life of privilege. Out of nowhere she found herself faced with really daunting circumstances, and had to find that pluck and courage within herself to deal with them.

It's a character that might not have always made the right choices, but who's smart and resourceful when the circumstances stack up against her. She doesn't immediately deal with it in that sci-fi hero mode, but she's someone very human who experiences the fear of being in over her head.

In Death Troopers, Dr. Cody does have those moments when nothing in her previous experiences has prepared her for what's going on, but she pushes on through it anyway. Those kinds of characters are terrific for suspense stories because we can identify with them.

There's also a rather comedic medical droid in Death Troopers. What made you want to give a voice to the kind of droid that usually doesn't take center stage in a Star Wars story?

A huge part of the charm of Star Wars are the droids. There was a conscious effort to give the droids in Star Wars the same kind of characteristics of iconic comedy teams, and that's one of the reasons why C-3PO and R2-D2 are so beloved.

I also like the idea of using a droid as a foil to Dr. Cody. The droid is constantly taking everything at face value medically, and you have this doctor who's been around the block a few times and understands how the inmates on a prison barge would use every opportunity they can to come to her sickbay. The droid understands the symptoms, but the doctor knows the motives. So while it can be frustrating for the doctor to deal with the droid, it can also be funny.

Why did you consciously want to have some of the characters be immune to the zombie virus when it was initially airborne?

That was kind of a direct lift from The Stand. I always liked the idea in The Stand that there was this virus that moved through 99.9 percent of the community and there was that .1 percent that was genetically predisposed to be protected from it. Whether they were good or bad they just had that little extra genetic LEGO stuck onto them that allowed them to not be affected by the virus.

The most horrifying part of the book for me didn't center around the zombies, but featured the survivors of the Star Destroyer itself. That neatly stacked piles of uniforms from the fellow soldiers they ate to survive gave me goosebumps! Why did you decide to make some of the humans creepier than the actual zombies?

When you're writing a book like this you not only consider the supernatural elements, but also know there's still a lot of potential to be had in the way people react to that situation. Your choices are either rise up and resist, or fold and accommodate and make concessions. Eventually, you might sacrifice your own humanity just in a desperate attempt to survive. That can be really horrible.

There's also a fine line between resorting to cannibalism for survival and practicing cannibalism because you like it. The zombies in your book have a virus that compels them to eat flesh, they're not calling the shots. But those particular survivors seem like they have become zombies by choice.

That's really insightful. I didn't think about that while I was putting it together, but I think that's totally true. There's a sense of contagiousness not just with the virus but with the mindset of appetite that can jump from the zombies to the people; which means they're infected in a more terrifying way.

Unless you just want to think of those survivors as the ultimate recyclers and they were just being green.

That's another excellent way of describing it. (laughs)

Was there anything you wanted to add to the book, but couldn't because of the book length requirements, or because it didn't fit in with the storyline?

There was a point where I actually wanted to try and see if I could show the effects of a droid if it got infected with the virus. I wrote a scene where some bizarre contaminated droid had gotten the virus, but it just wasn't working out in the practical sense of the continuity.

I also wanted to follow the idea of one of the zombies actually getting away from the Destroyer without falling apart for some reason, like having a strain of the virus that allowed it to endure. But then I really just wanted to follow the survivors.

The way you wrote Death Troopers lends itself to having one heck of a horrifying prequel. Any chance fans will be getting the tale of what happened on the Star Destroyer before the prison barge showed up?

Actually, I just finished the next book and sent it to Shelly Shapiro. It's a prequel that deals with the virus and where it came from.

What do you think of the Death Troopers cosplay that's been happening because of your book? Were you able to see the members of the 501st Legion in all their bloody glory at Comic-Con?

I've been able to meet of them at my book signings. Ed Dennis from the Southern California Garrison was at my signing at the Barnes & Noble in Huntington Beach. He built a second suit of armor that was all zombified. When I shook his hand it was sticky with fake blood!

Why do you think Star Wars fans, who might not read horror fiction, should give the book a read?

When I sit down to write, regardless if it's a Star Wars novel or a horror novel or a suspense novel, the same elements come into play. Unless the writer can get inside the story and make it come alive and make it work, they really have no right to ask for the readers' time.

But if they can do that, then the reader is in for a really good experience regardless of whether they consider themselves a horror or a sci-fi reader. Those genres, when they're done right, have in common a well-executed story.

If you enjoy the Star Wars universe, then you'll enjoy this story even if you wouldn't normally pick up a zombie novel otherwise. If I've done my job, you'll enjoy it regardless.

Extrait :
THE NIGHTS WERE THE WORST.

Even before his father's death, Trig Longo had come to dread the long hours after lockdown, the shadows and sounds and the chronically unstable gulf of silence that drew out in between them. Night after night he lay still on his bunk and stared up at the dripping durasteel ceiling of the cell in search of sleep or some acceptable substitute. Sometimes he would actually start to drift off, floating away in that comforting sensation of weightlessness, only to be rattled awake -- heart pounding, throat tight, stomach muscles sprung and fluttering -- by some shout or a cry, an inmate having a nightmare.

There was no shortage of nightmares aboard the Imperial Prison Barge Purge.

Trig didn't know exactly how many prisoners the Purge was currently carrying. He guessed maybe five hundred, human and otherwise, scraped from every corner of the galaxy, just as he and his family had been
picked up eight standard weeks before. Sometimes the incoming shuttles returned almost empty; on other occasions they came packed with squabbling alien life-forms and alleged Rebel sympathizers of every stripe and species. There were assassins for hire and sociopaths the likes of which Trig had never seen, thin-lipped things that cackled and sneered in seditious languages that, to Trig's ears, were little more than clicks and hisses.

Every one of them seemed to harbor its own obscure appetites and personal grudges, personal histories blighted with shameful secrets and obscure vendettas. Being cautious became increasingly harder; soon you
needed eyes in the back of your head-which some of them actually possessed. Two weeks earlier in the mess hall, Trig had noticed a tall, silent inmate sitting with its back to him but watching him nonetheless with a single raw-red eye in the back of its skull. Every day the red-eyed thing seemed to be sitting a little nearer. Then one day, without explanation, it was gone.

Except from his dreams.

Sighing, Trig levered himself up on his elbows and looked through the bars onto the corridor. Gen Pop had
cycled down to minimum power for the night, edging the long gangway in permanent gray twilight. The Rodians in the cell across from his had gone to sleep or were feigning it. He forced himself to sit there, regulating his breathing, listening to the faint echoes of the convicts' uneasy groans and murmurs. Every so often a mouse droid or low-level maintenance unit, one of hundreds occupying the barge, would scramble by on some preprogrammed errand or another. And of course, below it all-low and not quite beneath the scope of hearing-was the omnipresent thrum of the barge's turbines gnashing endlessly through space.

For as long as they'd been aboard, Trig still hadn't gotten used to that last sound, the way it shook the
Purge to its framework, rising up through his legs and rattling his bones and nerves. There was no escaping it, the way it undermined every moment of life, as familiar as his own pulse.

Trig thought back to sitting in the infirmary just two weeks earlier, watching his father draw one last shaky
breath, and the silence afterward as the medical droids disconnected the biomonitors from the old man's ruined body and prepared to haul it away. As the last of the monitors fell silent, he'd heard that low steady
thunder of the engines, one more unnecessary reminder of where he was and where he was going. He remembered how that noise had made him feel lost and small and inescapably sad-some special form of artificial gravity that seemed to work directly against his heart.

He had known then, as he knew now, that it really only meant one thing, the ruthlessly grinding effort of
the Empire consolidating its power.

Forget politics, his father had always said. Just give 'em something they need, or they'll eat you alive.

And now they'd been eaten alive anyway, despite the fact that they'd never been sympathizers, no more than low-level grifters scooped up on a routine Imperial sweep. The engines of tyranny ground on, bearing them forward across the galaxy toward some remote penal moon. Trig sensed that noise would continue, would carry on indefinitely, echoing right up until-

"Trig?"

It was Kale's voice behind him, unexpected, and Trig flinched a little at the sound of it. He looked back and
saw his older brother gazing back at him, Kale's handsomely rumpled, sleep-slackened face just a ghostly
three-quarter profile suspended in the cell's gloom. Kale looked like he was still only partly awake and unsure
whether or not he was dreaming any of this.

"What's wrong?" Kale asked, a drowsy murmur that came out: Wussrong?

Trig cleared his throat. His voice had started changing recently, and he was acutely aware of how it broke
high and low when he wasn't paying strict attention.

"Nothing."

"You worried about tomorrow?"

"Me?" Trig snorted. "Come on."

"'S okay if you are." Kale seemed to consider this and then uttered a bemused grunt. "You'd be crazy not
to be."

"You're not scared," Trig said. "Dad would never have-"

"I'll go alone."

"No." The word snapped from his throat with almost painful angularity. "We need to stick together, that's what Dad said."

"You're only thirteen," Kale said. "Maybe you're not, you know..."

"Fourteen next month." Trig felt another flare of emotion at the mention of his age. "Old enough."

"You sure?"

"Positive."

"Well, sleep on it, see if you feel different in the morning... " Kale's enunciation was already beginning to go muddled as he slumped back down on his bunk, leaving Trig sitting up with his eyes still riveted to the long dark concourse outside the cell, Gen Pop, that had become their no-longer-new home.

Sleep on it, he thought, and in that exact moment, miraculously, as if by power of suggestion, sleep actually began to seem like a possibility. Trig lay back and let the heaviness of his own fatigue cover him like a blanket, superseding anxiety and fear. He tried to focus on the sound of Kale's breathing, deep and reassuring, in and out, in and out.

Then somewhere in the depths of the levels, an inhuman voice wailed. Trig sat up, caught his breath, and
felt a chill tighten the skin of his shoulders, arms, and back, crawling over his flesh millimeter by millimeter,
bris tling the small hairs on the back of his neck. Over in his bunk the already sleeping Kale rolled over and
grumbled something incoherent.

There was another scream, weaker this time. Trig told himself it was just one of the other convicts, just another nightmare rolling off the all-night assembly line of the nightmare factory.

But it hadn't sounded like a nightmare. It sounded like a convict, whatever life-form it was, was under attack.

Or going crazy.

He sat perfectly still, squeezed his eyes tight, and waited for the pounding of his heart to slow down, just
please slow down. But it didn't. He thought of the thing in the cafeteria, the disappeared inmate whose name he'd never known, watching him with its red staring eye. How many other eyes were on him that he never saw?

Sleep on it.

But he already knew there would be no more sleeping here tonight.
A noter qu'un roman-préquelle est prévu, toujours écrit par Joe Schreiber. ;)
"One can concentrate so closely on the words of a sentence that one thereby misses the meaning. As can happen in any area of life. You must never lose focus on the larger landscape." - Commander Mitth'raw'nuruodo, Outbound Flight
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Jaweco
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Re: Death Troopers

Message par Jaweco »

Avis/critiques de l'ancien forum :

H@n :
'A y'est, j'ai terminé ! Very Happy
Bon ben dans l'ensemble le roman tient vraiment la route, j'ai bien aimé. En fait, c'était comme je m'y attendais : pas un grand chef-d'oeuvre, mais un bon roman quand même.
Dès le début, l'intrigue est très présente. On introduit juste les personnages, et comme l'avait prédit Jaweco : deux des principaux personnages sont bien des adolescents.Il y a beau de quoi effrayer, mais justement, l'une des forces du bouquin est le fait ce ne sont pas les seuls héros. En effet, deux ou trois autres personnages sont aussi dans l'intrigue principale, ce qui nous permet de percevoir les évènements de différents points de vues. Pour en finir avec les personnages, j'ai été surpris par la présence de Han Solo et de Chewie. Ils sont introduits au moment où l'histoire commençait un peu à ralentir.

Parlons de l'histoire. Comme prévu, horreur et suspense au rendez-vous. Certains passages sont d'ailleurs assez...gore, même il fallait s'y attendre. Si vous avez l'habitude de regarder du Tarantino, alors il ne devrait pas y avoir de gros problèmes Razz L'avantage du roman étant que chaque chapitre est assez court, on progresse vite et on veut vite connaitre la fin. D'ailleurs, je ne vous la dirai pas, émotions au RDV Smile . L'écriture, quant à elle, est vraiment agréable et rapide, l'auteur est à suivre, je crois qu'il doit faire un autre bouquin bientôt.
"One can concentrate so closely on the words of a sentence that one thereby misses the meaning. As can happen in any area of life. You must never lose focus on the larger landscape." - Commander Mitth'raw'nuruodo, Outbound Flight
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jedi-mich
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Re: Death Troopers

Message par jedi-mich »

J'hésite à me procurer ce roman via le bust-up qui va avec :)
Je sais pas encore, selon si c'est le paperback ou le hardcover.
On verra bien.
En tout cas avec le peu que j'ai vu sur Red Harvest, j'espère que je ne serais pas déçu après cette attente
S'il peut saigner...............on peut le tuer..............." : Major Dutch Schaefer
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Jaweco
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Re: Death Troopers

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Le buste ? Je crois me rappeler avoir vu une image où on le voit avec la version hardcover, mais là c'est Sebi qu'il faut interroger, c'est lui expert. Mais je pense que c'est le format hardcover qui va avec.

Pour moi ça sera paperback tout simple. Mais j'ai reçu aujourd'hui le troisième tome de Darth Bane en paperback, donc lecture de Death Troopers pas pour tout de suite. Et vu que j'ai commencé La Main de Thrawn et qu'il faut que je finisse cette duo avant d'entamer Dynasty of Evil, et vu que ce sont quand même deux beaux pavés, ça repousse encore plus loin ! :P
"One can concentrate so closely on the words of a sentence that one thereby misses the meaning. As can happen in any area of life. You must never lose focus on the larger landscape." - Commander Mitth'raw'nuruodo, Outbound Flight
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Re: Death Troopers

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Bon voilà, terminé Death Troopers... à l'image du nom de la barge-prison impériale qui y figure, quelle purge ! Vraiment très très bof. Ce n'est même pas réellement mauvais, ça n'a juste aucun intérêt.

L'histoire... il n'y en a pas. Ce n'est qu'un truc sans aucune originalité digne des pires séries Z. Aucune intégration réelle à l'univers SW, cela pourrait très bien ne pas s'y passer si ce n'est pour la présence de deux personnages. Remarquez c'est sans doute mieux comme ça. Aucun contexte, aucune mise en scène, aucune explication. Que dalle. Scénario inexistant. Pas d'ambiance non plus, l'auteur semble infoutu d'établir une atmosphère malsaine, un comble pour quelqu'un apparemment spécialisé dans l'horreur. Juste une succession d'effets gores totalement gratuits, sans le moindre intérêt. C'est vraiment de l'horreur pour faire de l'horreur. Si ce n'est que même ainsi l'auteur arrive à se fourvoyer dans des incohérences. Notamment un virus capable d'infester un mort qui l'est depuis déjà des semaines. Autant que ce virus contamine les vivants, les tue puis les "ressuscite", bon, c'est le principe, mais qu'il puisse infester et se multiplier dans un hôte mort depuis des semaines, c'est juste... pas crédible pour deux sous. L'effet "dramatique" voulu qui en est tiré... est réduit à néant.

Les personnages sont ultra plats. Le bon côté des zombies en général (dans les trucs bien faits du moins, The Walking Dead par exemple), c'est de faire ressortir les instincts les moins glorieux des vivants. Ici, que nenni. Rien. Personnages inintéressants. On ne se sent absolument pas concerné. Le fait qu'un des personnages principaux soit un gamin de 14 ans n'arrange rien. Celui auquel je me suis le plus "attaché" est... un droïd (Waste), c'est pour dire la superficialité des vivants. Et quant aux deux que j'ai mentionné plus haut, leur présence tient surtout du fan service et tend surtout à discréditer encore plus l'affaire.

Le fait que les chapitres soient hyper courts (parfois une ou deux pages seulement) renforce encore plus le côté superficiel, rien n'est développé correctement. Le seul "avantage" au vu du niveau du truc, c'est que ça permet de lire vite, on en a fini plus vite.

Bref, si, Schreiber a quand même réussi un truc : faire de son lecteur un zombie. C'est tellement vain ! Heureusement, c'est très court, 270 pages avec des caractères loin d'être petits. Je l'ai lu parce qu'il avait malgré tout d'assez bons échos, je lui ai laissé sa chance. J'ai vu le résultat. Je ne lirai donc pas Red Harvest, faut pas pousser.

Et dire que Kemp avec Crosscurrent arrivait très bien à construire une ambiance de malade sans jamais tomber dans le gore... c'était glauque, mais c'était prenant et pas gratuit, ça servait vraiment une histoire avec une mise en contexte et tout ce qui va avec. C'est quand même d'une tout autre classe.
"One can concentrate so closely on the words of a sentence that one thereby misses the meaning. As can happen in any area of life. You must never lose focus on the larger landscape." - Commander Mitth'raw'nuruodo, Outbound Flight
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Boba Fett
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Re: Death Troopers

Message par Boba Fett »

Moi qui était pressé de le lire, ta critique me donne moins envie soudainement :p
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Re: Death Troopers

Message par Evan Lupin »

Effectivement, ça refroidit.

Peut-être le résultat de vouloir mélanger les genres.
Il n'y a pas d'ombre sans lumiere, ni de lumiere sans ombre.

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Re: Death Troopers

Message par Jaweco »

Bah, le mélange des genres aurait pu donner un truc sympa si ça avait été bien fait... mais ce n'est pas le cas, c'est du bas de gamme de chez bas de gamme. C'est un mélange des genre totalement opportuniste, c'est surtout ça. Déjà, pourquoi vouloir faire un truc avec des zombies alors qu'on pouvait très bien faire un truc d'horreur en restant cohérent avec l'univers... je sais pas moi, un truc à la Alien par exemple. Mais non, des zombies. Bon soit, je veux bien rester ouvert. Je suis pas fan du concept mais pas au point de pouvoir apprécier si c'est bien fait (je recite l'exemple de The Walking Dead). Sauf que là, on n'a absolument aucun travail autour de ça. Un virus qui décime presque tout le monde et les "ressucite", point (oui je sais, va y avoir du développement dans Red Harvest, mais bon, c'est un peu tard pour ça). Le reste, c'est du survival, et même pas palpitant parce que pas crédible pour deux sous. Les personnages sont plats. Par exemple, Schreiber pose quelques bases d'opposition entre un personnage et un autre au début... on se dit qu'il va s'en servir, et on attend une confrontation... qui n'arrive jamais. Ou est en tout cas tellement expédiée et dénuée d'enjeu qu'elle n'a aucun intérêt. L'auteur aligne les trucs gores, mais c'est gratuit, ça ne sert pas pas l'histoire (mais pour ça il faudrait qu'il y en ai une d'histoire, donc forcément...). Un des rares trucs qui aurait pu être une bonne idée est simplement ruiné parce qu'on y croit pas une seconde (voir ma critique et ma remarque sur le virus qui contamine un corps déjà mort depuis des semaines). Je suis vraiment resté totalement hermétique tout du long.
"One can concentrate so closely on the words of a sentence that one thereby misses the meaning. As can happen in any area of life. You must never lose focus on the larger landscape." - Commander Mitth'raw'nuruodo, Outbound Flight
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Boba Fett
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Re: Death Troopers

Message par Boba Fett »

Merci, de me donner encore moins envie de le lire :p
C'est sur que il aurait pue faire un roman horreur Star Wars, mais en ne faisant pas intervenir des zombies, c'est le "truc" le plus rependue des romans horreurs, ils auraient pue être un peu plus original.
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Dark Devaster
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Re: Death Troopers

Message par Dark Devaster »

Je ne juge pas d'un livre que je n'ai pas lu, mais pour info il existait déjà des virus et autres formes de vie parasitaires, créés par les Sith, qui tuent les êtres vivants et les ressuscitent en zombies : Zombies de Korriban, Esprits des Gardiens,... Evidemment, ça vient surtout de sourcebooks, donc l'ignare que tu es ne pouvais pas le savoir ( d'autant que tu ne lis pas mes fiches :P). Mais là où je voulais en venir, c'est que l'auteur avait peut-être des consignes in-universe à respecter ;).
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Boba Fett
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Re: Death Troopers

Message par Boba Fett »

Bah justement le fait qu'il y en avait déjà eu, ils auraient pue changer :?
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Jaweco
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Re: Death Troopers

Message par Jaweco »

DD >> Mais détrompez-vous cher ami ! Avant de le commencer, j'avais regardé s'il y avait un truc de ce genre dans l'UE (qui dépasse le stade éventuel des Galaxies de la Peur évidemment). Et j'avais bien vu un truc sur les zombies de Korriban tiré des Légende des Jedi. Et comme je disais j'étais prêt à être ouvert à ce genre de chose si ça avait été bien fait. Or on ne peut que constater une chose : l'auteur fait des zombies pour faire des zombies, sans chercher à donner le moindre contexte. Encore moins rattacher ça à l'UE. Donc je maintiens, c'est totalement gratuit et de surcroit mal fait. Après, que ça fasse partie d'un cahier des charges, pourquoi pas. Mais dans ce cas, rien de l'empêchait de créer son propre truc autour de ça, ou ne serait-ce que rendre son récit vivant (paradoxalement :mrgreen:), ne serait-ce que créer des personnages avec de vraies interactions, j'en passe. Je juge sur pièce, les conditions de travail c'est son problème, à lui de s'adapter et de proposer quelque chose de bon. Pas d'excuse pour la médiocrité ! C'est mauvais c'est mauvais ! :P
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Dark Devaster
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Re: Death Troopers

Message par Dark Devaster »

Ca a le mérite d'être clair :P.
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Vana
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Re: Death Troopers

Message par Vana »

C'était bien la peine de faire un roman d'horreur si c'est pour faire dans le bas de gamme qui ne fait même pas peur ^^" espérons que l'auteur ne va pas recommencer :roll: ils vont peut-être le virer XD

Je me dis, l'auteur n'y connaît sûrement rien en SW et n'a donc rien lu de l'UE, c'est pourquoi il a sûrement voulu prendre le moins de risques possible de contredire le reste, et donc rester dans une histoire qui n'a aucun rapport avec SW.
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jedi-mich
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Re: Death Troopers

Message par jedi-mich »

Enfin fini
Bon déjà, au départ ça part mal vu que 2 des protagonistes sont des ados et je me suis dit, "bon ben ça va être plutôt orienté jeunesse". Et effectivement je trouve que c'est vraiment le cas. Première déception (surtout quand on a vu les premiers épisodes de Walking dead). Ensuite, on n'a pas de grand massacre vu que tout se passe en peu de temps et tout le monde est infecté à part les persos principaux. Alors franchement, l'auteur ne m'a pas donné envie de tourné les pages étant donné qu'il ne va pas y avoir de pertes chez les survivants (ou si peu). C'est dommage car il y avait tout de même de bonnes idées qui n'ont pas été creusées comme la survie des quelques membres de l'équipage du croiseur pendant plusieurs semaines. Là, l'ambiance aurait pu être vraiment malsaine avec le manque de nourriture, etc... qui fait qu'ils deviennent aussi des zombies à leur manière.
En ce qui concerne la partie scientifique du virus, pero, ça ne m'a pasdérangé. Le pourquoi et le comment de sa présence est crédible pour moi car l'Empire a tout le temps cherché à fabriquer des armes biologiques. J'ai même été convaincu par la faille du virus. Peut-être que je ne suis pas difficile dans ce domaine :D J'ai trouvé l'évolution des zombie intéressante.
Concernant les persos, il est vrai qu'on n'y s'attache pas vraiment. Sartoris devient "gentil" trop facilement et au bon moment.
Sur les scènes gore, ben, on a juste des descriptions de machouillage mais finalement on n'a pas vraiment de poursuite avec des hécatombes où l'horreur est plus dans l'ambiance que dans le visuel. Et dans le visuel, mouais, bon, on peut facilement imaginer de la bidoche.
En fait, la partie la plus intéressante du livre est vers la fin avec le groupe de survivant du croiseur impérial où ça tombe les uns après les autres, et où on a vraiment de l'horreur, et aussi dans les comportements. Dommage, car ces passages sont courts.

Bref, heureusement que ce roman est court en nombre de pages car c'est vrai que c'est pas passionnant même si pour moi c'est pas mauvais. Je dirai que comme pour les séries télé, ce roman est un loner (à part par rapport au reste de l'UE et sans incidence). Il se lit facilement. Et pour finir je trouve que c'est gâché car il y a de bonnes choses mais que l'auteur a été obligé de freiner son enthousiasme.
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Re: Death Troopers

Message par Jaweco »

Apparement Red Harvest est un peu mieux au sens où aucun perso connu n'apparaît dont on saurait direct qu'il survivra... mais les différents avis que j'ai pu lire laissent entendre que sinon c'est clairement dans la lignée de Death Troopers, avec les mêmes caractéristiques générales... autant dire que ça ne m'intéresse pas, même si ceux qui ont aimé le premier aimeront très probablement le second ! Dans tous les cas, je doute que Schreiber soit de nouveau invité à écrire pour la licence, la réception étant pour le moins tiède...
"One can concentrate so closely on the words of a sentence that one thereby misses the meaning. As can happen in any area of life. You must never lose focus on the larger landscape." - Commander Mitth'raw'nuruodo, Outbound Flight
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Owex Goard
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Re: Death Troopers

Message par Owex Goard »

Salut,

Vendredi dernier mon ami à acheté Deathtrooper( en anglais) et il l'a beaucoups aimé et c'était son premier livre Star Wars. Il l'a dévoré. personnellement je ne peux rien dire (pas lu, pas encore) mais je crois bien qu'il a été converti a Star Wars. Il a acheté 3 autre livres dont Red Harvest et darl lord: the rise of Darth Vader et il n'est pas vraiment fan de Star Wars. Death trooper a du l'impressioner.
Ne pense pas au Futur... Pense a ce qu'il y a Après...
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starwarsanakin63
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Re: Death Troopers

Message par starwarsanakin63 »

sa a l'air d'être un bon roman, mais un peu gore :lol:
mais c'est plutot une bonne idée, assez original
Dernière modification par starwarsanakin63 le 17 avr. 2011, 19:57, modifié 1 fois.
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